16 November 2014

Perils of perception: A 14-country study


This is a nice visual showing citizens' misperceptions regarding key social statistics in their own country.

6 comments:

Stagflationary Mark said...

Nice!

For what it is worth, I got off to an excellent start. I grew up in a small farming community in Eastern Washington. There were very few pregnant teens, if any. And to the best of my knowledge, our small town was not being overrun by Muslims.

It tended to get even easier from there, just because I look at unemployment data a lot. ;)

That said, I did underestimate how many people count themselves as Christians though. Perhaps that's because I am an athiest/agnostic and don't live anywhere near the bible belt. That said, we did have quite a few churches in my small farming community. I definitely should have factored that in.

Karlo said...

I found the number high as well. On the other hand, I've noticed that a lot of people, when pressed, will say that they vaguely believe in some vague God that has some vague resemblance to something in Christianity. I guess they get counted as Christian in these sorts of polls.

Stagflationary Mark said...

On the other hand, I've noticed that a lot of people, when pressed, will say that they vaguely believe in some vague God that has some vague resemblance to something in Christianity.

If pressed, they might even believe that the vague God is watching them directly. You know, because the vague God has nothing better to do than dwell on one individual out of 7 billion who is talking in public.

Further, wouldn't want to risk being damned for all eternity in a vague hell just because one made a statement that shows a lack of faith in the all forgiving merciful vague God. ;)

That's the problem right there.

1. If you believe and are right, good things happen.

2. If you believe and are wrong, you're dead. You won't even know it.

3. If you don't believe and are right, you're dead. You won't even know it.

4. If you don't believe and are wrong, you're going to hell.

The twisted math says we must believe. It's the only rational thing to do. That's if we believe in twisted math of course.

Here's an alternate belief that I hold. I do not enjoy singing songs of faith. My version of hell would be singing them for all eternity. Perhaps the vague heaven would not really make me all that happy.

Perhaps the vague hell is a place I could just kick back and play video games on a secluded beach hell under the hot sun. Slothful! Sinful! Relaxing. :)

Karlo said...

The problem with Pascal's wager is that there really aren't just two alternatives. Rather, there are infinite possibilities. It's just as likely that there's a God who loves athiests and hates all people who believe in things with no evidence. All the athiests could end up in heaven sippin' single malt scotch (probably Bowmore) and having heavy-duty existential dialogues with the cool God while all the believers of all faiths burn in hell. (:

Stagflationary Mark said...

Karlo,

Well said.

Do Animals Have Souls?

Now, I can't prove that animals have souls. But then, I can't prove that you or I have one either. And for all those people who firmly believe that animals don't have souls - well, I suppose if there really is a heaven, you'll probably have the job of cleaning out all the litter boxes...

Karlo said...

I think we'll find out that God is the great dolphin who created dolphins in his image. Humans were just an afterthought--a sort of prop to test dolphin morality and determine whether they could enter the great heavenly ocean of the afterlife where fish are abundant and sharks don't exist.