19 May 2010

The new Saudi Arabia

Here's an interesting factoid:

Canadian oil sands are expected to become America’s top source of imported oil this year, surpassing conventional Canadian oil imports and roughly equaling the combined imports from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, according to IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates, a consulting firm.


This doesn't mean that oil sands have surpassed conventional oil, but that seems to be the direction we're heading. Which means a new source of oil that is plentiful, expensive, and ecologically problematic. I still don't understand why people can't just buy smaller cars and live closer to work.

3 comments:

BadTux said...

One problem the working poor have is that a) all that's available on the used car market for cheap are large cars (for obvious reasons -- everybody who can afford to buy a smaller car is buying one, doh), and b) anything closer to work is way too expensive. A 2 bedroom apartment close to work here in the Silicon Valley goes for over $2,000 per month! And don't even talk about buying a house here, you pay $400,000 for a small 1,000 square foot house. The result is that the working poor *have* to live way, way out, as in a one hour drive to work as a hairdresser way out. We're basically turning into the 3rd world here, where the elites live close in so that they're close to work and the unseemly poor are shoved out to the periphery. This is the opposite of what the pattern was in most of the post-WW2 development of the USA, but that pattern was dependent upon cheap oil and well-maintained freeways capable of handling suburban sprawl, neither of which applies anymore...

- Badtux the Former-working-poor Penguin

Karlo said...

I'm a member of the slipping middle class who pays a premium (close to two grand a month) to live in a very tiny flat within 40 minutes of work. The costs eats of much of my wages, but the schools and crime are bad enough in other neighborhoods--there's really no good solution.

libhom said...

This is one of many cases where government solutions are necessary. We could dramatically reduce our need for any oil by massively expanding our public transportation systems.