11 April 2006

V for Vendetta

Last weekend, I finally saw V for Vendetta. The film has a comic book quality as the hero (a true "army of one") takes on a fascist regime (a revived British empire?) But if you're willing to suspend disbelief, the film is highly entertaining. In contrast with the grunting macho men that dominate typical Hollywood revenge flix, the hero of the film is intelligent, witty, and occasionally even poetic. The ruling power has some echoes with the Shrub Misadministration, in particular, in the way it constantly manipulates facts and public perception.

Other discussion of the movie can be found at Cry Monkey and Hyosando.

9 comments:

Jason Cherniak said...

It was an excellent movie. My only complaints are that it makes Guy Fox look like a hero and shows the blowing up of Parliament as a symbol of freedom.

Karlo said...

I must confess that I didn't know anything about Guy Fawkes. Having read the Wikipedia entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Fawkes), Fawkes seems to have merely been a religious fanatic bent on blowing things up (familiar, eh?) The website did mention an interested factoid: the American term "guy" is derived from Guy Fawkes's name.

Pisces Iscariot said...

The original story in Alan Moore's graphic novel was a comment on Thatcher's Britain and the creeping Totalitarianism that seemed to be evolving there.
The movie is an update really, but still asks us to question what our leaders are doing.
The movie points the finger at the US as well as at Britain.
V is a terrorist, but we're on his side, even though he plans to blow the Houses of Parliment to smithereens. (The building is a symbol, he says - destroying it sends a message)
This is deeply subversive and given the current climate in both the US and Britain I'm surprised there has not been a stronger rightwing backlash.
This is an important movie, whether you agree with the morality or not. It points to many of the crimes that are going on within both countires.

Karlo said...

I thought it's comments on the manipulation of the media and history had a lot to say to us now--especially as we discover almost daily how Bush and other's have fed the people outright falsehoods to justify the war and policies. The film also showed the way that the media creates a climate of constant fear in order to encourage people to accept fascist programs as the "only" alternative.

CyberKitten said...

I think 'V' is a surprisingly under rated film that will, in time, become a huge cult classic. It is deeply subversive in an obvious way but in an insidious way too. Those who can see beyond the obvious will be deeply moved by it I think.

It's a brave movie to be made at this time in both our histories and an important one too.

Karlo said...

I'd agree that it's very under-rated. After I saw some of the reviews, I expected something a bit canned and formulaic. Formulaic it ain't.

Peachy Clean said...

I wonder why

You know, I can't seem to find any comments from arch-liberals, or major leftist publications praising this movie. I know there is evidence of a message against Bush message here, but I find it odd that it has mostly been isolated to blogs and forums.

On the other side of the pond, conservative pundits have blasted the film and generally made their pressence felt. I wonder why that is? Michael Moore himself just says to watch this movie, but not much else. Libertarians have generally supported it though. Look here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V_for_Vendetta_(film)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V_for_Vendetta_(film)#Comments_from_political_sources

Does anyone know of any big names that have said nice things about this film? I find this strange!

Peachy Clean said...

Forgot to mention:

Anarchists: Ambivilance
Libertarians: Like it.
Conservative Christians: General dislike
LGBT: Generally like.
Liberals: Not much from the mainstream pundits.

Source:
Summary of commentary

Karlo said...

Good leftist would probably feel rightfully queasy about using violence in a vague way against the ruling power unless there was sufficient organization to overtake the power and replace it with something better. (I imagine that the more principled anarchists might even agree, although their analysis of organization would be different.) A better model for how to bring down a state can probably be found in the movie Gandhi.