1 October 2005

Nixon Now

Has the U.S., ever had so many high-ranking government officials under investigation at the same time? The Bush administration is going to make tricky Dick's debacle look like a cake walk. Federal auditors now say that the Bush administration violated the law by buying favorable news coverage of President Bush's education policies, by making payments to the conservative commentator Armstrong Williams, and by hiring a public relations company to analyze media perceptions of the Republican Party. The investigators, from the Government Accountability Office, say that the Bush administration has disseminated "covert propaganda" in the United States, in violation of U.S. law. This makes sense to me. When I pay my taxes, I don't expect it to go to the newly founded Bush Ministry of Propaganda. And this in the wake of the indictment and that Martha-wannabe . I think Shrub's purpose in life is to make even the most anti-Nixon among us realize that tricky-Dick really wasn't as bad as it gets.

4 comments:

delftsman3 said...

Even in the highly unlikely event that every one of these "Bushies" get convicted, Bill Clinton will still hold the all time record for number of officials of an administration tried,convicted, and imprisoned, AND the record for highest number of convicted felons friends with prior to election. Just two of his records...won't mention that he was the first President convicted of perjury while in office, first President accused of rape, or administration with the highest number of deaths of witnesses in criminal trials with which he was associated to in some manner.

Karlo said...

We can definitely do better than Clinton and Bush, I'd agree. I do think, though, that the trail of connections run much deeper in the case of Bush junior. You should read House of Bush, House of Saud some time. The Bush Jr. connections with big oil and corrupt business figures are staggering.

Glen Dean said...

Does that book detail the Clinton connections to the House of Saud?

As far as indictments, the only problem with all of these indictments is that no crime was committed.

Karlo said...

Actually, the book does go back to the period before Bush. The Saudis were trying to buy anyone they could find and spent a fair amount of money on people who were in the running for president but never quite made it. According to the author, the relationship between the House of Saud and Clinton wasn't that warm. The author, by the way, provides extensive evidence throughout using documents that are publicly available. As for "no crime," the use of public funds to pay people to produce deceptive propaganda is apparently a crime according to the indictment.